Selection of jury foremen as a measure of the social status of women.

Beckham, B., & Aronson, H. (1978). Selection of jury foremen as a measure of the social status of women. Psychological Reports, 43, 475-478.

THE STUDY HYPOTHESIZED THAT A MEASURE OF SOCIAL STATUS WHICH EMPLOYED THE RATIO OF AVAILABLE JURORS TO THE NUMBER RAISED TO FOREMAN MIGHT DETERMINE THE STATUS OF A MINORITY OF SUBGROUP. TO ASCERTAIN THE AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND TO OBTAIN DATA FOR COMPARISON, A FEASIBILITY STUDY WAS CONDUCTED WITH FEMALES AS THE MINORITY GROUP. THE SAMPLE CHOSEN INCLUDED EVERY CRIMINAL TRIAL HELD AT THE FEDERAL DISTRICT COURT LEVEL IN DALLAS AND SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS. THERE WAS A TOTAL OF 155 TRIALS. OF THE 1,860 JURORS, 862 WERE WOMEN AND 998 WERE MEN. HOWEVER, AMONG THE 155 JURY FOREMEN, 14 WERE WOMEN AND 141 MEN. THUS, WOMEN WERE REPRESENTED BY LESS THAN ONE-FIFTH THEIR PROPORTIONAL NUMBER. RESULTS CONFIRMED THE STUDY’S HYPOTHESIS THAT THE PROPORTION OF FOREMEN WHO ARE FEMALES REFLECTS THE SOCIAL STATUS OF THAT GROUP DURING THE TIME AND IN THE COMMUNITIES THE JURORS REPRESENTED. THE REPORT ALSO STATES THAT IT IS UNLIKELY THAT ANY REGION IN THE UNITED STATES HAS AN EQUAL REPRESENTATION OF FEMALE FOREMEN. Only 9% of forepersons were female (14 of 155); 46% expected on the basis of chance (72).

https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/Publications/abstract.aspx?ID=61281