Scientific juror selection: Sex as a moderator of demographic and personality predictors of impaneled felony juror behavior.

Moran, G., & Comfort, J. C. (1982). Scientific juror selection: Sex as a moderator of demographic and personality predictors of impaneled felony juror behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 47, 1052-1063.

Moran, G., & Comfort, J. C. (1986). Neither “tentative” nor “fragmentary”: Verdict preference of impaneled felony jurors as a function of attitude toward capital punishment. Journal of Applied Psychology, 71, 146-155.

Contingencies between 23 demographic/personality variables and jury verdict, juror predeliberational verdict, tendency to change his or her verdict, and self-perceived participation and influence were examined by step-wise multiple regression for 319 felony jurors. Conviction-prone male Ss were more interested in having families, had more children, and had lower incomes. They evidenced higher authoritarianism and socialization but lower scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale. Conviction-prone female Ss had higher scores on the Just World Scale, evidenced legal authoritarianism, and were more empathic and less anomic. In this venue, S’s foreign ancestry was more remote. In addition, predictors were identified for the S’s tendency to change verdicts and to perceive himself or herself as participating in and influencing the jury’s deliberation. The practical utility of scientific juror selection in actual trials is discussed.

Scientific juror selection: Sex as a moderator of demographic and personality predictors of impaneled felony juror behavior. – ResearchGate. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/232583228_Scientific_juror_selection_Sex_as_a_moderator_of_demographic_and_personality_predictors_of_impaneled_felony_juror_behavior [accessed Jul 20, 2015]. Attitude toward death penalty weakly related to pre-verdicts and unrelated to post-verdicts in both studies. <1>Numerous demographic, personality, and attitudinal variables weakly related to self-reported pre- and post-deliberation verdict preferences, vote change, participation, and influence. Relationships generally differed by sex. 14% of respondents reported changing their vote during deliberation. <2>Capital juries deliberated longer than noncapital juries.

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/232583228_Scientific_juror_selection_Sex_as_a_moderator_of_demographic_and_personality_predictors_of_impaneled_felony_juror_behavior