An empirical study of the effect of leadership influence on decision outcomes in different sized jury panels.

Eakin, B. A. (1975). An empirical study of the effect of leadership influence on decision outcomes in different sized jury panels. Kansas Journal of Sociology, 11, 109-126.

An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of direction of leadership influence on decision outcomes requiring a large consensus in groups of six and twelve members. The need for this empirical research was prompted by the recent Supreme Court decision to reduce the size of juries from twelve to six members. One hundred and sixty subjects were randomly assigned to high and low leadership influence in six and twelve member panels and asked to deliberate as jurors on a civil suit. The findings were as follows: (1) direction of leadership had substantial impact on decision outcome, regardless of group size, and (2) leadership in the low direction, i.e., pressure toward lesser monetary compensation, tended to be more successful than toward high compensation. Though these findings are supportive of recent jury reform, some new questions as to the role of leadership in decision making groups such as juries are raised.

Strong effect of confederate foreperson advocacy on damages regardless of jury size; confederates more effective in arguing for lower (as opposed to higher) damage awards.

http://www.jstor.org/stable/23255231?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents

https://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/bitstream/handle/1808/6100/KJSV11N1A8.pdf?sequence=1