A comparison of male and female dominated juries in a case of coerced sex with a male plaintiff.

Hyme, H. S., Foley, L. A., & Pigott, M. A. (1999). A comparison of male and female dominated juries in a case of coerced sex with a male plaintiff. American Journal of Forensic Psychology, 17, 67-80.

Research strongly demonstrates gender differences in attributions of responsibility in rape and sexual harassment cases. This study involves a case of coerced sex initiated by a woman toward a man. 103 college students and 94 jury eligible Ss participated as mock jurors. Mock jurors in male dominated (MDJs) and female dominated juries (FDJs) were compared. There were no significant differences in attributions of responsibility or confidence level prior to group deliberations. As hypothesized, however, after group deliberations, jurors in FDJs attributed more responsibility to the individual defendant than jurors in MDJs. Contrary to the hypothesis, jurors in MDJs and FDJs were not significantly different in their attributions for the plaintiff. The hypothesis that gender minority jurors would attribute responsibility in a way similar to gender majority jurors was supported. Finally, the hypothesis that jurors in FDJs would be more confident in their decisions than jurors in MDJs was also supported. It appears that gender majority jurors exerted a powerful influence on gender minority jurors. After deliberations, jurors in MDJs reflected attitudes of men and jurors in FDJs reflected attitudes of women. No pre-deliberation differences by sex; post-deliberation attributions of responsibility affected by gender composition of jury. Jurors in female-majority juries placed more responsibility on female defendant; jurors in male-dominated juries placed more responsibility on defendant’s corporation.

http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/1999-11021-004